10 Best Rugby League Autobiographies

Updated on: November 2020

Best Rugby League Autobiographies in 2020


Confessions of a Rugby Mercenary

Confessions of a Rugby Mercenary
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2020
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The Real McCaw: Richie McCaw: The Autobiography

The Real McCaw: Richie McCaw: The Autobiography
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2020

Open Side

Open Side
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2020

The Grudge: Scotland vs. England, 1990

The Grudge: Scotland vs. England, 1990
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2020

The Iron Duke: Bobby Windsor - The Life and Times of a Working-Class Rugby Hero

The Iron Duke: Bobby Windsor - The Life and Times of a Working-Class Rugby Hero
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2020

Proud: My Autobiography

Proud: My Autobiography
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2020

Legends of Irish Rugby: Forty Golden Greats

Legends of Irish Rugby: Forty Golden Greats
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2020

The Nearly Men of Rugby League: Volume Two

The Nearly Men of Rugby League: Volume Two
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2020

Carry Me Home: My Autobiography

Carry Me Home: My Autobiography
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2020

Nobody Beats Us: The Inside Story of the 1970s Wales Rugby Team

Nobody Beats Us: The Inside Story of the 1970s Wales Rugby Team
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2020

Geena Davis: Making a Positive Difference

Forget "Thelma and Louise". Forget "Commander in Chief". How about when Geena Davis, portraying Dottie Hinson in "A League of Our Own", stretched out her long arm and caught the baseball bare handed?

Did you know that Geena became proficient in the Swedish language when she lived in Sweden as an exchange student? In addition to being an Academy Award winning actress, as a child she learned to play several musical instruments. Multi-talented, she played the organ at her church. In spite of those accomplishments, her self-esteem suffered due to being much taller than her classmates. Not being tiny and petite, she did not fit the stereotypical role for what little girls should look like. She turned what was viewed as a liability into a positive asset by becoming a model. She had the audacity to pursue an acting career, even though 6' women were not in much demand in Hollywood. What is notable about Ms. Davis is that, as she actively works to make a positive difference regarding female gender roles, she had never lost her femininity. As a role model for young girls she embodies grace, beauty and strength.

Growing up in the late 1950's and early 1960's Geena must have noticed the disparity of how genders were shown in text books, on television and in the movies. Females were helpless creatures waiting for their Prince Charming to rescue them, was the general theme. And, father knew best. Ladies were women in the kitchen with aprons. Being pretty, girls learned, lead to a girl's popularity. Good looks were favored over intelligence and assertiveness. Jock girls were often seen as "dykes" and shunned. Sporty girls were called, "Tomboys". There was no word like "Marygirls" applied to boys who preferred traditionally feminine pursuits. They were called "sissies", implying that having a more gentle female nature was a bad thing. There were exceptions, of course. Lucille Ball's "I Love Lucy" character was often shown fighting to break gender role restrictions. . "Nancy Drew" and "Brenda Starr, Reporter" also encouraged little girls to aspire to more than "housewife and mother" when they grew up.

Geena Davis does not sit back and enjoy her fame and fortune. She founded "See Jane" an organization that works to change the way female characters are portrayed in the media. "Monkey see, monkey do" is an apt expression about children's formative years. Everything children see influences the adults they will become. "Early exposure of children to less stereotyped gender roles will contribute to less sexism and improved relations between the sexes", Alvin F. Poussaint, M. D., Professor of Psychiatry proclaims. Dr. Poussaint is quoted in "Now You See 'Em Now You Don't: Gender amp; Racial Disparity in TV for Children". The brief was commissioned by the "See Jane Program of Dads amp; Daughters".

The "See Jane" website tells us that it "seeks to engage professionals and parents in a call to dramatically increase the percentages of female characters -- and to reduce gender stereotyping -- in media made for children 11 and under." Geena Davis is making a positive difference as a role model for young girls. She is also making a positive difference with her work to provide more positive role models for boys and girls today. Her experience in the industry makes this a perfect role for the former Victoria's Secret model. For more about information visit the "See Jane" website at: .

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