10 Best Rugby Shirts

Updated on: September 2020

Best Rugby Shirts in 2020


Amazon Brand - Goodthreads Men's Long-Sleeve Solid Rugby, Navy, X-Large

Amazon Brand - Goodthreads Men's Long-Sleeve Solid Rugby, Navy, X-Large
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2020

Charles River Apparel Unisex-Adult's Classic Rugby Shirt, Black/Red, L

Charles River Apparel Unisex-Adult's Classic Rugby Shirt, Black/Red, L
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2020
  • Cotton jersey with a classic 4 inch rugby stripe
  • White twill collar stitched with reinforcing tape for added strength
  • Heavy-duty white twill placket conceals rubber buttons
  • Rib knit cuffs
  • Reinforced stitching throughout for added durability

Guinness Traditional Rugby Jersey, X-Large

Guinness Traditional Rugby Jersey, X-Large
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2020
  • 100% cotton Guinness rugby jersey
  • Elastic waist for extra comfort
  • Embroidered Guinness trademark label chest patch
  • Traditional two-panel jersey

Sport-Tek Classic Long Sleeve Rugby Polo. ST301 True Navy/ Carolina Blue L

Sport-Tek Classic Long Sleeve Rugby Polo. ST301 True Navy/ Carolina Blue L
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2020
  • 6.5-ounce, 100% ring spun cotton jersey
  • Engineered with yarn-dyed stripes
  • Woven twill collar
  • Twill-taped neck
  • 2-button twill-reinforced placket with rubber buttons

Front Row Long Sleeve Plain Rugby Shirt Red/White L

Front Row Long Sleeve Plain Rugby Shirt Red/White L
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2020
  • Chest (to fit) S - 34/36", M - 37/39", L - 40/42", XL - 43/45", XXL - 46/48"
  • 100% Cotton Weight 270gsm

Chaps Men's Heritage Collection Rugby Shirt, Vintage Pine Multi, M

Chaps Men's Heritage Collection Rugby Shirt, Vintage Pine Multi, M
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2020
  • Special edition heritage collection Chaps laurel wreath embroidered at the left chest.
  • Size medium has approx. A 30" Front body length and a 251/4" Sleeve length.
  • Long sleeves with ribbed cuffs.
  • Twill rugby collar.
  • Two-button placket. Rubber buttons.
  • weave type: Knit
  • special size type: standard

Hope & Henry Boys' Long Sleeve Rugby Shirt

Hope & Henry Boys' Long Sleeve Rugby Shirt
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2020
  • 100% Organic Cotton, exclusive of trims. Garment made using conventional production methods. Learn more by visiting the "Organic" tab in our brand store.
  • Quilted faux suede elbow patches.
  • Crisp woven collar and placket.
  • Machine washable.

Mens Long Sleeve Rugby Polo Shirt, XL Black/Graphite Grey

Mens Long Sleeve Rugby Polo Shirt, XL Black/Graphite Grey
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2020
  • A true classic!
  • 100% ring spun cotton
  • Very cool rugby style polo shirt
  • Two buttons
  • A lighter weight and authentic rugby polo in popular team colors

Amazon Essentials Big Boys' 2-Pack Long-Sleeve Pique Polo Shirt, Red/Rugby Navy Stripe/White, M (8)

Amazon Essentials Big Boys' 2-Pack Long-Sleeve Pique Polo Shirt, Red/Rugby Navy Stripe/White, M (8)
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2020
  • Get him set for school with this long-sleeve polo shirt featuring a two-button placket and ribbed collar and cuffs
  • Straight hem
  • Uniforms made better: we listen to customer feedback and fine-tune every detail to ensure quality, fit, and comfort

SPORT-TEK Men's Long Sleeve Rugby Polo S True Navy/Carolina Blue

SPORT-TEK Men's Long Sleeve Rugby Polo S True Navy/Carolina Blue
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2020
  • ST300 Heavyweight 12-ounce 395 gsm 100% cotton jersey
  • Engineered yarn-dyed stripes
  • Woven twill collar
  • Twill-taped neck
  • 2-button twill-reinforced placket with rubber buttons

Invictus (2020) Feels a Little Scattered

Clint Eastwood's Invictus (2020) is a valiant effort to capture post-apartheid South Africa, the politics of Nelson Mandela, and the sporting excitement of the 1995 Rugby World Cup. Putting all this into a single film, however, is problematic.

I think, ultimately, it's a problem of focus. This has all the elements for an inspiring film. Set in early post-apartheid South Africa, Invictus interconnects two stories: new president Nelson Mandela's attempts to bring healing and reconciliation to an impoverished country torn asunder by decades of racist strife, and the successful drive of the South African rugby union team, the Springboks, to victory in the 1995 Rugby World Cup. These two stories are actually connected, claims producer and director Clint Eastwood (not to mention John Carlin, whose book Playing the Enemy is the basis for this movie).

In the first story, actually told from the viewpoint of his bodyguards as much as Mandela himself, the new black president struggles to win over a bureaucracy and an economic elite still populated chiefly by whites. The frequent scenes with his black and white bodyguards, who grumble and chafe constantly in the privacy of their office, seem like they're put in for comedic effect, but they're also immensely symbolic. Mandela plays a quiet but decisive and insightful father figure determined to bring to the nation the peace and tranquility he clearly has been unable to bring to his own family. (He doesn't get along well with his daughter, but then, he was in prison for virtually her whole life, so she may not even regard him as her dad, not really.)

In the second, the Springboks are struggling to achieve a winning record going into the 1995 Rugby World Cup. They do so and ultimately win the championship, with the help of their sole black player, Chester Williams. Chester's inclusion is problematic. It's historically accurate -- he was there, after all. But the film doesn't explain why Chester is on a team that white South Africa identified as their own beginning in the apartheid period, nor does it play up any sort of enmity that might exist between Chester and his white teammates. (This is in opposition to Williams's autobiography, which claims that members of the 1995 national team ostracized him and used "racist names" to refer to him.)

Mandela, according to the film, saw the rugby team as a way to bring South Africa together. Blacks might follow rugby, but many, out of hostility to what the Springboks represented, habitually cheered for whichever team was facing them. Whites followed the Springboks loyally, and would have bitterly represented an attempt to re-name the team the Proteans (as his aide observes, Mandela sacrifices a considerable amount of political capital by blocking that decision and then throwing his weight behind the Springboks team as it already stands). By the end of the film, his bodyguards are playing rugby together, even though the black ones profess not to know the rules. And Mandela inspires the captain of the team (played ably by Matt Damon) too, at least in theory, giving him a poem (the eponymous "Invictus," by William Henley) and arranging a tour of his old jail on Robben Island.

Ultimately, though, it's really not clear what that accomplishes. I don't think the team really needed Mandela's help to succeed (although they certainly seemed to, being extremely weak in the beginning of the movie and very strong at the end, it's not at all clear what they've gained in the meantime or how that relates to Mandela's little poetry reading with Matt Damon). Although Mandela insists otherwise, it's clear he really doesn't care much for rugby personally: it's an act he's putting on based on the political calculation that it will win support among both whites and blacks. Courageous move on his part, but again, all of that suspense is happening off the pitch. Or off the field, as our American cousins might say.

Which is why I was left feeling a little unsatisfied with the several rugby games played during this movie. I know, the movie is about the rugby tournament. And about Mandela's support for the game. But seriously, the team itself are essentially flat characters, aside from the odd touching vignette such as their visit to an impoverished schoolfield where, led by the enthusiastically worshipped Chester Williams, they put the children through their paces in some basic rugby drills.

Not that any of this is bad. It's just that's only half the story, it's not always clear how it relates to the second focus on Mandela, and as a result we never really get a chance to look all that deeply into the lives or the thinking of any of the players, with the partial exception of captain Francois Pienaar (Damon's character).

The relentless shift to the rugby pitch, however, also detracts from the area where the real suspense is going on: the political sphere populated by Mandela, his long-suffering chief aide, and his perennially anxious bodyguards. Here, too, unfortunately, there simply isn't enough time on camera to allow a proper analysis of everything that's going on. Mandela does not really change during the movie, either. He faces no great personal crises. Instead he is steady, assured, and confident throughout the course of the movie. Rugby is a political calculation for him. It's a risky one, which could have backfired, but that's all it is.

Sure, there are moments when he seems to be getting quite captured by it all, even walking out of what looked like an important international economic meeting for an update on the game. But at the end of the day, this is about politics, not about sports, in the mind of Nelson Mandela. His bodyguards are definitely seen getting progressively cozier with one another, probably because they're forced into working together and cooperating rather than because they happened to wander into a few games of pickup rugby on the lawn outside the presidential house.

All of these remarks do seem rather cynical. I do want to point out that the 1995 Rugby cup was a defining moment in the early post-apartheid history of South Africa. Mandela attempted with remarkable success, according to the movie, to turn the Springboks from a symbol of white oppression into a symbol of national unity and strength. But the very greatness of that achievement makes the attempt to retell the story in Invictus seem that much more partial and incomplete. And then, of course, there's real life, which continued on after the cup was awarded in 1995, and turned out not to be so clean and reconciled and race-free as we might have hoped after watching this movie.

Other recent movie reviews by this author:

- The Blind Side (2020)
- Lord of War (2005)

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